Re: Mid major vs Ivy. Where would you tell your child to go?


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Posted by Ivys will make it work on November 09, 2017 at 22:20:24:

In Reply to: Re: Mid major vs Ivy. Where would you tell your child to go? posted by truth on November 06, 2017 at 20:36:47:

: : : : : Money may be the issue. The Ivy League, by agreement, does not offer athletic or academic scholarships, just financial aid. If an athlete says he is on a full ride at an Ivy it is based on need only. Having said that, an Ivy athlete can write his ticket to business success after graduation. That's the real scholarship. So yes, Ivy is a great choice. It's the 40 year choice.

: : : : Your answer is technically correct when it comes to Ivy League universities and colleges not offering athletic or academic/performance-based scholarships to their students.

: : : : But your response that the only alternative is "financial aid" (by which I take it you mean student loans) is not correct.

: : : : Admission to all Ivy League schools is "need-blind." Yale was the first to institute the policy in 1966. Under this policy, all candidates are evaluated for admission with no regard to ability to pay. The overall message is: If you can get into one of these highly selective schools, they will do everything in their power to help you afford it.

: : : : Harvard, Princeton and Yale have long had sliding scale tuition policies that offer significant discounts to students from middle-to-lower-income households. In some cases, no payment at all is required.

: : : : In the case of Yale and Harvard, if a student's family earns less than $60,000 a year (this figure may have risen since I last looked), they will pay nothing for their education. At both schools, the percentage the student pays goes up incrementally (from zero to 10 percent of annual income) with family earnings of $60,000 to $120,000 a year [source: Fitzsimmons and Yale Public Affairs].

: : : : Similarly, in 2008, Dartmouth eliminated tuition for students from families with incomes under $75,000 and extended its need-blind admissions policy to international students [source: Dartmouth Public Affairs].

: : : : Princeton is unique among Ivies (and all U.S. colleges for that matter) for its "no loans" policy for all students. If you get into Princeton, the college will supply grants -- not loans -- to pay for all demonstrated need, allowing each and every student to graduate debt-free. This "no loans" policy proved incredibly successful for attracting low-income applicants to Princeton. From 1998-99 (when the no loans system was launched) to 2005-06, matriculation of low-income student doubled at Princeton [source: FinAid].

: : : : Basically, the Ivies have such huge endowments that they can easily afford to offer virtually any student that needs it full or near-full grants to cover the cost of their education.

: : : : The only bad news about financial aid and scholarships at Ivy League schools is that it is are entirely need-based. Ivy League schools are prohibited from offering athletic scholarships and none of the schools offer merit-based or talent-based awards.

: : : : That said, Ivy League students are free to win merit-based or performance-based scholarships from outside institutions and organizations, including state, federal and private scholarships. And many of the Ivy League students do just that.

: : : : There are literally hundreds of organizations and groups that offer non-need-based scholarships for college students. See, e.g., https://www.scholarships.com/financial-aid/college-scholarships/scholarships-by-type/academic-scholarships-and-merit-scholarships/

: : : : I suspect that if the player you're talking about was really offered admission to Princeton, that money most certainly was not a consideration in the choice of schools.

: : : : BTW, that's a pretty odd list of schools for one student. I mean, Kennesaw State University hardly seems to fit into a collection of Big West and Ivy schools. Just sayin...

: : : Not sure what he wants to major in. Maybe Nevada has a great resort hospitality program- but if that's what he wants to study, UNLV is the call. More likely, someone sold him on Nevada's long list of televised games.. oh, wait. oh, I know, it's the top-tier non-conference schedule.. oh, wait. Games v. Radford and UC Davis don't count. Maybe it was the talk about the beauty of northwestern Nevada.. oh, wait. the place is a dump. I got it, it has to be the long line of pros coming out of Nevada. There was Kirk Snyder and then that big white dude about 6 years ago. Can't think of his name. Oh, yeah, they go to the NCAA's every year. They don't? Dang it!
: : : Yeah, the call is Ivy League..

: : Does the kid even qualify for the Ivy? He can still follow 40 year plan with a public university degree.

: Good point.. if the kid isn't academically at the IVY level, it makes no sense to go as a dropout is probably around the corner.
Ivies pride themselves on graduation rates. They will make it work if they accept a student. They have amazing graduation rates as well as professional opportunities. A lot of academic support is available.



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